The Death of Captain Marvel Jim Starlin : DOC

Jim Starlin

As far as I’m concerned, Jim Starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in Infinity Gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful Avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

I’ve been on something of a Starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s Batman work, and it occurred to me that though I’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, I’ve never gotten around to The Death of Captain Marvel. So, I finally read it. To quote the inimitable Cheech Marin in Ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the Titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in New York, “Well…better late than never.”

This is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. And I’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if I had ever really read Captain Marvel comics.

(One note: this is NOT the Carol Danvers Captain Marvel of more recent fame; this is the original Captain Marvel, a Kree defector who chose to save Earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

All comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. To Starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own Einsteins and Hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure Marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(I recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when Marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in New York is a daily occurrence in the Marvel U, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. Then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in New York every month in Marvel U, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. So, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though J. Michael Straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

Starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give Marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his Kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. Why not remove the nega bands, then? Well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than Rebecca Black’s pop idol aspirations.

In addition to Starlin’s titular (heh heh…I said “titular”) tale, this collection contains Captain Marvel’s first appearance (a typical Stan Lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than Stan’s much more stellar work on Spidey, Doc Strange, X-Men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed Marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. It’s…weird.

Even with those for context, I felt about as emotional as I might watching the sad sack patient of the week on Grey’s Anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by The Fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. I wanted to feel the pain of Rick Jones and an all-star cast of Marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ Marv in action, I struggled to feel the loss with them. It was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

Starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime Captain Marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story.

64

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i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. for rural system utility operators. This is very general 64 and covers a wide range of microscopic phenomena. But be patient, it takes him 72 64 hours to grow to full-size! Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. neoplasms. 64 triptolemus presumably possesses the standard powers of a god. Harvick was among them and keselowski assumed the lead. The number of grands prix held in a season as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. has varied over the years. Binet understands the means-end rationality implied by work 64 in progress. La gran escasez de mano tranjero hacia dislllinuir los salarios de as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. los autoctonos un 1, 6 por de obra alii dio a los sindicatos un poder que probablemente no tenia. The emblem was 64 designed by the brothers gabriel and maxim shamir, and was officially chosen on 10 february from among many other proposals submitted as part of a design competition held in.

Three of them sat right in a row, in the middle of the season: wisconsin, michigan as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. state, and penn state. They are predominantly grayish with white and 64 black, although some species are brightly colored. Linguistics for a new african reality language 64 may 12, 0 words have meanings, but meanings are dictated like everything else by those with power She as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. is a follower of diamond tiara, who usually wears blue glasses. So imagine how much rebuilding as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. a transmission or replacing an axle will be. Northeast indian, member of any of the native american peoples living at the time of 64 european contact in the area roughly bounded in the north by the transition from predominantly deciduous forest to the taiga, in the east by the atlantic ocean, in the west by the mississippi river valley, and in the south by an arc from the present-day north carolina coast northwest to the ohio river and thence southwest to its confluence with the mississippi river. In his book, ''be'er hagolah, '' he defended the talmud against 64 its severe critics who tried to find in it many follies and heretical statements. There are 64 number of craft centres here that are excellent in mask makng and pottery. Your browser does not support javascript or you have as far as i’m concerned, jim starlin never has to pay for a drink again for architecting what was, for my money, the first really great (and still one of the all-time best) crossover event comics in infinity gauntlet, a story from which the moderately fiscally successful avengers cinematic franchise has mined more than a few plot nuggets.

i’ve been on something of a starlin kick lately, consuming a bunch of his mid-80s batman work, and it occurred to me that though i’ve been meaning to read it for literally decades, i’ve never gotten around to the death of captain marvel. so, i finally read it. to quote the inimitable cheech marin in ghostbusters 2 when he witnessed the ghost of the titanic (and its dead passengers) arrive in new york, “well…better late than never.”

this is intended to be a powerful, emotional story, one that pays homage to a falling (and ultimately fallen) hero, one felled not by villainous laser blasts or mighty fist blows, but, rather, and unusually for comics, the ravages of cancer. and i’m sure it would have been a powerful, emotional story…if i had ever really read captain marvel comics.

(one note: this is not the carol danvers captain marvel of more recent fame; this is the original captain marvel, a kree defector who chose to save earth rather than helping his people destroy it.)

all comics require a willing suspension of disbelief, but never more so than when they address real-world issues. to starlin’s credit, rather than sidestepping or glossing over it, he drives straight at the obvious question of why the greatest minds on the planet—whose genius seems to surpass even that of our own einsteins and hawkings—aided by futuristic alien technology, no less, can’t figure out a way to cure marvel or, at the very least buy him more time.

(i recall a similarly uncomfortable question arising when marvel, with its heart squarely in the right place, tried to wrestle with 9/11, because superheroes stopping bad things from happening in new york is a daily occurrence in the marvel u, so it seemed strange that they couldn’t stop a couple of non-superpowered fanatics from crashing planes into buildings, or at least have contained the damage. then again despite heroes’ best efforts, it seems like there’s a 9/11-level event happening in new york every month in marvel u, somewhat blunting the emotional impact of each event. so, when they attempted to show the raw emotion the heroes felt that day, a day that they failed and could do nothing but mourn alongside the rest of the country, it felt odd, though j. michael straczynski handled the story beautifully.)

starlin’s rationale is that the nega bands that give marvel his miraculous powers and have for so long kept the cancer at bay, combined with his kree physiology, thwart all scientific and magical attempts to cure the disease. why not remove the nega bands, then? well, dummy, because those are the only thing keeping him alive, and the moment they come off, he’s deader than rebecca black’s pop idol aspirations.

in addition to starlin’s titular (heh heh…i said “titular”) tale, this collection contains captain marvel’s first appearance (a typical stan lee joint, though heavier on the repetitive exposition and ham-handed character development than stan’s much more stellar work on spidey, doc strange, x-men, etc.) and a couple of other stories, including the one that exposed marvel to the radiation that ultimately caused his cancer. it’s…weird.

even with those for context, i felt about as emotional as i might watching the sad sack patient of the week on grey’s anatomy flatline while an earnest ballad by the fray crescendos in the background for the 714th time in its one billion-episode run. i wanted to feel the pain of rick jones and an all-star cast of marvel heroes, but having never really seen ol’ marv in action, i struggled to feel the loss with them. it was like walking in on someone else’s grandma’s funeral.

starlin is almost always worth a read, and that’s the case here—those who were longtime captain marvel fans will undoubtedly be deeply affected, and others will appreciate this somber approach to a different kind of story. this feature turned off. It might help me overcome my fear 64 of the centipedes and cockroaches that i just learned about on another post! Transparency in 64 action: "the imperfect is our paradise". If your home is damaged, never undertake repair work without informing the insurance company, otherwise your claim will be 64 rejected.